Visualizing Math

A blog dedicated to mathematics. 

 
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cherry-merchant:

Sierpinski transformation

centerofmath:

The Ulam spiral shows a pattern in the (unpredictable) primes

(via mathmajik)

mathani:

Get you best paper, cut a circle and fold it, fold it so that the circumference falls on a fixed point inside. Repeat, using random folds. Now see the creases. This is how you paper-fold an ellipse.

mathani:

Get you best paper, cut a circle and fold it, fold it so that the circumference falls on a fixed point inside. Repeat, using random folds. Now see the creases. This is how you paper-fold an ellipse.

(via try-and-touch-my-asymptote)

hipster-graphs:

1: sinx=cosy

2: 2siny=cosx

3: sinx=cosy+1

4: sinx=cosy+2

5: sinx=cosy+1

Asker Anonymous Asks:
I'm not very good at math, and I don't really understand very much of what you post, BUT I LOVE IT!!
visualizingmath visualizingmath Said:

We have a lot in common, Anonymous. Thanks for the message! 

Asker Anonymous Asks:
I just love your blog! So intersting! :D
visualizingmath visualizingmath Said:

Thanks, Anonymous!

Asker Anonymous Asks:
This blog is awesome! Definitely one of my favorites. I love learning maths, and what you post makes maths look even more interesting!
visualizingmath visualizingmath Said:

Thank you! I’m glad you love to learn mathematics! 

mindfuckmath:

Seeing as how it’s Oscar Sunday, here is an awesome math flavoured movie quiz from Spiked Math.  You can find the solutions here, and if you enjoy this quiz you’ll enjoy Part 2 and Part 3.  For the record, I’m predicting that 12 Years a Slave collects a whole lot of richly deserved Oscar love including Best Picture. 

proofsareart:

Graph Theory. Graph theory is the study of graphs, which are tools for studying the interactions between objects at a very abstract level. It is arguably the second-most applicable field of mathematics outside of linear algebra, because its central objects lend themselves well to modeling many kinds of phenomena. It has been gainfully applied in networks, traffic flow, electrical circuits, decision analysis, and game theory. It also is extremely applicable inside of mathematics because of the deep relationship between graphs and certain algebraic objects.

Graph theory proofs tend to be pretty dull to read incorrectly. They come from these amazing pictures, and then they get translated into linear writing. People who work with graphs have (collectively) gotten very good at doing this, and there is a very rich language with which to do it; so rich that it is not even very hard to skip over the pictures entirely. You can read the text and follow its validity, and the proof is over. But the proofs are always much more satisfying if you have a pencil in hand.

I tried to put in a couple of pictures that came up while I was thinking about this proof, but there were many, many more.

(via imathematicus)

try-and-touch-my-asymptote:

scienceisbeauty:

One of the answers to the topic: Visually stunning math concepts which are easy to explain at Mathematics Stack Exchange.

I think if you look at this animation and think about it long enough, you’ll understand:

  • Why circles and right-angle triangles and angles are all related
  • Why sine is opposite over hypotenuse and so on
  • Why cosine is simply sine but offset by pi/2 radians

This is also why radians are more superior than degrees.

wildberry-poptart:

We got to draw circle things in class.

wildberry-poptart:

We got to draw circle things in class.

(via imathematicus)